Category Building Products

16
Sep
Strange Bedfellows: Commo...
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Comments Off on Strange Bedfellows: Common Ground for Takata Airbags and Moldy Buildings

Airbag maker Takata made headlines recently as a seventh airbag-related fatality forced the Japanese company to announce the largest auto recall in history. Takata had initially recalled faulty airbags in 18 million vehicles, believing the malfunctions to be linked to cars in hot, humid climates. Although the airbags were failing in other climates as well,

4
Mar
What’s to Prevent a Rep...
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Comments Off on What’s to Prevent a Repeat of 2005 Failures in South Florida’s 2015 Construction Boom?

The immediate future looks bright for South Florida as it basks in a revival of new construction. But Florida-based Liberty Building Forensics Group® (Liberty) cautions designers, engineers, and contractors not to let history repeat itself. A significant number of condo projects built in Miami in the early 2000’s ended in litigation due to building failures

This is part 3 of 3. The solution to the clash between brand standards and regional best practices is threefold: 1) Design professionals and contractors need to assert that specific requirements for hotels in certain climates cannot be violated if hotels are to avoid mold and moisture problems. 2) The brand must accept that certain

This is part 2 of 3. The inherent flaw in the situation is that brands claim their standards are only guidelines. They believe the designer or contractor on site is ultimately responsible for interpreting how the regional climate might impact brand standards. Ideally, the design and construction teams who are responsible for making sure everything

This is part 1 of 3. Florida-based Liberty Building Forensics Group® (Liberty), a leading building forensics firm that has solved some of the world’s largest and most complex building moisture and mold problems, has a warning for unsuspecting hotel design and construction teams. Rigid adherence to brand standards without factoring in specific regional and climatic

10
Dec
OWNER Caution! – Why Ar...
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Comments Off on OWNER Caution! – Why Are Designers Not Aware of CPVC Failures? (Part 4)

This is the last of four posts in a CPVC piping failures series by Donald B. Snell, PE. Recommendations The next time CPVC piping is considered for installation or replacement, building owners, designers, and installers should be aware of the need for CPVC to be compatible with other products and materials in order to minimize risk

26
Nov
OWNER Caution! – Why Ar...
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Comments Off on OWNER Caution! – Why Are Designers Not Aware of CPVC Failures? (Part 3)

This is the third of four posts in a CPVC piping failures series by Donald B. Snell, PE. Potential Contaminants on the Inside of the Pipe The use of metal piping in domestic water, condensate drain piping, and fire sprinkler applications has given way to plastic composition piping for the previously mentioned advantages. Applications may be

12
Nov
OWNER Caution! – Why Ar...
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Comments Off on OWNER Caution! – Why Are Designers Not Aware of CPVC Failures? (Part 2)

This is the second of four posts in a CPVC piping failures series by Donald B. Snell, PE. Causes of CPVC Failures When CPVC failures do occur, most frequently they are due to contamination issues and minor stresses imparted on the pipe. (See article by Duanne Priddy on Why Do PVC & CPVC Pipes Occasionally Fail?.) Contamination issues

29
Oct
OWNER Caution! – Why Ar...
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Comments Off on OWNER Caution! – Why Are Designers Not Aware of CPVC Failures? (Part 1)

This is the first of four posts in a CPVC piping failures series by Donald B. Snell, PE. CPVC Advantages There are many advantages of using Chlorinated Poly (Vinyl Chloride) (CPVC) piping (such as domestic water, condensate drain piping, and fire sprinkler piping) in building systems. These advantages include: Lower cost Ease of installation Physical

This is the nineteenth and final post in a series by J. David Odom (ASHRAE), Richard Scott (AIA/NCARB/LEED AP), and George H. DuBose (CGC). It was first published as a mini-monograph for NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards). To summarize our recommendations, we believe that the following should occur in an effort to enhance

11
Jun
Aiming for Problem Avoida...
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This is the tenth post in a series by J. David Odom (ASHRAE), Richard Scott (AIA/NCARB/LEED AP), and George H. DuBose (CGC). It was first published as a mini-monograph for NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards). The use of new products mandates that the designer implement several additional steps to avoid problems: Better understand

14
May
Materials & Resource...
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This is the eighth post in a series by J. David Odom (ASHRAE), Richard Scott (AIA/NCARB/LEED AP), and George H. DuBose (CGC). It was first published as a mini-monograph for NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards). Intent of these 14 Materials & Resources Credits: Reuse of existing building components, the management of construction waste,

This is the third post in a series by J. David Odom (ASHRAE), Richard Scott (AIA/NCARB/LEED AP), and George H. DuBose (CGC). It was first published as a mini-monograph for NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards). After reviewing the designs of hundreds of new buildings over the past 20 years and observing the failures

6
Feb
The Hidden Risks of Green...
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Comments Off on The Hidden Risks of Green Buildings: Avoiding Mold & Moisture Problems

This is the first post in a series by J. David Odom (ASHRAE), Richard Scott (AIA/NCARB/LEED AP), and George H. DuBose (CGC). It was first published as a mini-monograph for NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards). “Most new products are experiments and most experiments fail.” ~ Quote from “How Buildings Learn: What Happens After